Secondat Montesquieu : all you need to know about the constitution reformer

Charles Louis de Secondat was born in Bordeaux, France, in 1689 to a wealthy family. Despite his family’s wealth, de Decondat was placed in the care of a poor family during his childhood. He later went to college and studied science and history, eventually becoming a lawyer in the local government. Charles’s father died in 1713 and he was taken care by his uncle Baron De Montesquieu, the president of the Bordeaux parliament. When the Baron died, he left Secondat his fortune, the office of the president and his title Baron De Montesquieu

Later, he was the member of Bordeaux and French academics of science. He studied the laws, customs and government of the countries of Europe. 

Secodant became famous by his famous Persian letters in 1721 which criticised the lifestyle and liberties of wealthy people and even the Church. The greatest work of writing by Montesquieu was on the spirit of laws (1748) which outlined his idea that how a government should work.

Montesquieu’s idea of the best government was the ‘seperation of powers’ in which three branches of government has equal but different powers. He wrote “when the law making and law enforcement power lies in the same person, there can be no Liberty.” According to him, each branch of the government should be inter-controllable so that no branch could threaten the Liberty of the people. This idea of constitution by Montesquieu, later, went on to become the basis of the constitution of United States of America

“Government should be set up so that no man fears another” 

Statue of Liberty : All you need to know about the “Liberty enlightening the world”

The statue of Liberty or La Liberté éclairant le monde as as they say in France, is a neoclassical sculpture on Liberty island on New York Harbor, New York city, USA. It was a gift from the people of France to the people of United States during the American revolution on October 28, 1886. The idea of sculpture was monumented by Email De Laboulaye and sculpted by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi


The Statue of Liberty is a figure of a robed woman representing Libertas, a Roman goddess. She holds a torch above her head(depicted as showing us the path to Liberty), and in her left arm carries a tabula ansata(Latin word for tablet with handles) inscribed in Roman numerals with “JULY IV MDCCLXXVI” (July 4, 1776), the date of the U.S. declaration of independence. A broken chain lies at her feet. 

The statue became an icon of freedom and of the United States, and was a welcoming sight to immigrants arriving from abroad.

The seven spikes of the crown represent the seven continents and oceans of the world and indicate the universal liberty

La FÈTÈ DE LA Musique: THE HISTORY

In October 1981, Maurice Fleuret became Director of Music and Dance at minister of cultural Jack Lang’s request, and applied his reflections to the musical practice and its evolution: “the music everywhere and the concert nowhere”. When he discovered, in a 1982 study on the cultural habits of the French, that five million people, one child out of two, played a musical instrument, he began to dream of a way to bring people out on the streets. It first took place in 1982 in Paris as the Fête de la Musique.

Ever since, the festival has become an international phenomenon, celebrated on the same day in more than 700 cities in 120 countries, including China, India, Germany, Italy, Greece, Russia, Australia, Peru, Brazil, Ecuador, Mexico, Canada, the United States, and Japan.

Fête de la Musique’s purpose is to promote music in two ways:

  • Amateur and professional musicians are encouraged to perform in the streets, under the slogan “Faites de la musique” (“make music”, a homophone of Fête de la Musique).
  • Many free concerts are organized, making all genres of music accessible to the public. Two of the caveats to being sanctioned by the official Fête de la Musique organization in Paris are that all concerts must be free to the public, and all performers donate their time for free. This is true of most participating cities, now, as well.

Despite there being a large tolerance about the performance of music by the general public of amateurs in public areas after usual hours, the noise restrictions still apply, and can cause some establishments to be forbidden to open and broadcast music out of their doors without prior authorization. So the prefectures of police in France can still forbid them to install any audio hardware in the street

Emmanuel Macron: All you need to know 

I never had any interest in politics but this man, Emmanuel Jean- Michel Frédéric Macron has inspired or you can say bounded me to write a blog on him because of his unbreakable will power and passion. Macron is so “Napoleon” as he has all the likeness referring to the great French emperor. Napoleon took the throne in 1804 when he was 34 whereas Macron took the throne in 2017 when he is just 39. It’s so likely.

It’s not often you see someone making his own party only a year ago and three years before no even knew his name and last night was crowned the youngest president of one of the most powerful and important country of the world- France by a big margin of votes (66.06% in his favour). 

The leader of his self-made party En Marche! proved all the odds wrong as a scandal ran through France before the election as well as Macron’s election campaign site was hacked. But it didn’t stop the 39 year old from winning and taking the oath to balance the nation’s wretched state of economy. He also promised to fully support the European Union (EU). 

Macron is considered as a middle class person as he was a investment banker and it’s​not long enough when he stepped into the politics as a whole. His wife is 24 years older than him (64 years). They tied their knot in 2007. Their love story began Emmanuel’s​school where she was a teacher and was told about Macron by his daughter Laurens. 

Macron promised make France a even better state than it is right now. His words after being elected as the president can be read but is very long lol so I’m just gonna write down his last words before ending the speech

“Let’s love France. From this evening, and for the next five years, I am going to serve it on your behalf, with humility, devotion and determination.

“Long live the Republic, long live France!

The Levée en Masse

During the French revolution, the national convention decreeded a ‘Mass levy’ on all the people of France of all ages. This was considered, by many historians, a significant event for the beginning of the ugly fire that ran through France called ‘LA TERREUR’ (The reign of terror). The following are all the points that were written or I should say embossed in the Levée en Masse

1. From this moment until that in which the enemy shall have been driven from the soil of the Republic, all Frenchmen are in permanent requisition for the service of the armies. The young men shall go to battle; the married men shall forge arms and transport provisions; the women shall make tents and clothing and shall serve in the hospitals; the children shall turn old linen into lint; the aged shall betake themselves to the public places in order to arouse the courage of the warriors and preach the hatred of kings and the unity of the Republic.

2. The national buildings shall be converted into barracks, the public places into workshops for arms, the soil of the cellars shall be washed in order to extract therefrom the saltpeter.

3. The arms of the regulation caliber shall be reserved exclusively for those who shall march against the enemy; the service of the interior shall be performed with hunting pieces and side arms.

4. The saddle horses are put into requisition to complete the cavalry corps the draft horses, other than those employed in agriculture, shall convey the artillery and the provisions.

5. The Committee of Public Safety is charged to take all necessary measures to set up without delay an extraordinary manufacture of arms of every sort which corresponds with the ardor and energy of the French people. It is, accordingly, authorized to form all the establishments, factories, workshops, and mills which shall be deemed necessary for the carrying on of these works, as well as to put in requisition, within the entire extent of the Republic, the artists and workingmen who can contribute to their success.

6. The representatives of the people sent out for the execution of the present law shall have the same authority in their respective districts, acting in concert with the Committee of Public Safety; they are invested with the unlimited powers assigned to the representatives of the people to the armies.

7. Nobody can get himself replaced in the service for which he shall have been requisitioned. The public functionaries shall remain at their posts.