Secondat Montesquieu : all you need to know about the constitution reformer

Charles Louis de Secondat was born in Bordeaux, France, in 1689 to a wealthy family. Despite his family’s wealth, de Decondat was placed in the care of a poor family during his childhood. He later went to college and studied science and history, eventually becoming a lawyer in the local government. Charles’s father died in 1713 and he was taken care by his uncle Baron De Montesquieu, the president of the Bordeaux parliament. When the Baron died, he left Secondat his fortune, the office of the president and his title Baron De Montesquieu

Later, he was the member of Bordeaux and French academics of science. He studied the laws, customs and government of the countries of Europe. 

Secodant became famous by his famous Persian letters in 1721 which criticised the lifestyle and liberties of wealthy people and even the Church. The greatest work of writing by Montesquieu was on the spirit of laws (1748) which outlined his idea that how a government should work.

Montesquieu’s idea of the best government was the ‘seperation of powers’ in which three branches of government has equal but different powers. He wrote “when the law making and law enforcement power lies in the same person, there can be no Liberty.” According to him, each branch of the government should be inter-controllable so that no branch could threaten the Liberty of the people. This idea of constitution by Montesquieu, later, went on to become the basis of the constitution of United States of America

“Government should be set up so that no man fears another” 

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